Facebook negotiates with record companies so you can use their songs in your videos

Facebook remains determined to strengthen its social network as a platform for creating videos. It is already working on improving its credibility for ads in this format, and has signed an MTV directive to lead its original content line. Their next move instead seems aimed at allowing users to create the best videos possible.

For this, according to internal sources told Bloomberg, Zuckerberg are negotiating with the record companies to give their consent to users to use their favorite songs in their own videos. In doing so, they will want to avoid those problems they already have with videos that violate the copyright of certain songs, an essential step for their aspirations to compete with YouTube.

According to Bloomberg, although the social network has been conducting these negotiations for at least a couple of years, in recent days it is redoubling its efforts according to negotiators, music publishers and trade associations. “We are hopeful that they are behind a music license for their entire web,” said David Israelite, president of the National Association of Music Editors.

A year ago we told you that Facebook was designing a tool to detect, as YouTube does, videos that contain music that violates copyright. The move Bloomberg reported today seems destined to address the same problem, but instead of eliminating infringing content by reaching agreements with the industry so that there are no problems with this type of videos.

If an agreement is reached like the one revealed by internal sources, you as a video creator could use the songs of the record labels that signed it without fear that your video will be persecuted or censored for it. This will help more creators decide to create their own content on Facebook, which will help the platform generate even more revenue for an increasingly important video trend.

The agreement that could redefine the industry

Beyond Facebook’s own interests, such an agreement could set a precedent, and could make the rest of businesses also move. It would indeed be a kind of starting point for Snapchat, Google and any other company that wants to negotiate similar deals not to stay one step behind.

This move would not only be beneficial for creators, but also for a Facebook with aspirations to compete with YouTube , and that is already creating a TV application. The success or failure of this movement will depend on the quality of content offered by this service, something for which it is essential to motivate those who create it.

Meanwhile, such deals could also benefit record labels. These have already seen in specialized digital platforms like Spotify or Apple Music a way to redefine its benefits, and that could take advantage of agreements of this type to benefit also of creations in social networks.

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